Why Jeep Used Vertical Cinemagraphs in their Super Bowl Ad

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Late last year we covered the rise of vertical video, and it’s foreseen popularity in advertising. We are also continually discussing how and why cinemagraphs are the ideal medium for marketing. Now, I don’t want to come to any conclusions here, as the notions above are both drawn on clear trends (and common sense) in the digital space, but it seems as though Jeep has taken a few tips from the vertical cinemagraphs we regularly post to social media.

Jeep’s “Portraits” ad aired during the halftime of Super Bowl 50. Their ad is truly revolutionary, and is one of the first to break such boundaries, especially during the most viewed TV broadcasts. Capturing the attention of 111.9 million viewers in the US alone this year, it fell just below last years 114.4 million. Touted as one of the best Super Bowl ads from this year, check it out below.

 Though it was aired on TV, Sean Reynolds, global executive creative director at iris, says “We always had the idea that because it’s a portrait ad, it would look great on a mobile device. So we spent a lot of time talking and testing with YouTube to make sure it played full-screen on a portrait device.” Taking up about only 48% of the horizontal screen, space which most advertisers try to fill with more content, this ad instead pulls your attention to the captivating images and cinemagraphs in the centre.

“There is a slight camera move on every image. It just really helped with the visual storytelling, and although subtle, I believe it helped with the craft of the final edit,” he said. The cinemagraphs, he added, were “something we always intended to do. The trick was not to overdo it, so as not to detract from the images themselves, but to add some additional texture. They also act as little visual ‘Easter eggs’ that make people want to go back and watch it again.” If you missed them, don’t worry, we’ve got you covered…

All cinemagraphs above are by Jeep, and are not in association with Flixel.

What do you think about the ad? Let us know in the comments!

(Flixel Marketing Manager)

When Cassandra was six, she was asked to share a story with her class…and hasn’t stopped telling them since. Now she does so through photography, video and writing, but with the same sense of wonder - and love for glitter - as her inner kid.